in ,

Filing For Divorce In Kenya – How To & Consequences

Filing For Divorce In Kenya

Filing for divorce can be a complicated and emotional process. It is important to understand the legal requirements and steps involved in filing for divorce in order to make the process as smooth and stress-free as possible.

In this article, we will discuss the steps involved in filing for divorce, including preparing for divorce, filing the necessary paperwork, and navigating the legal process.

Grounds For Divorce In Kenya

In Kenya, there are several grounds on which a person can file for divorce. These grounds are outlined in the Matrimonial Causes Act, which governs divorce in Kenya. Here are the grounds for divorce in Kenya:

  1. Adultery: Adultery occurs when one spouse engages in sexual intercourse with someone who is not their spouse. If a person can prove that their spouse has committed adultery, they can file for divorce on this ground.
  2. Cruelty: Cruelty includes physical or mental abuse, harassment, or other forms of mistreatment. If a person can prove that their spouse has been cruel to them, they can file for divorce on this ground.
  3. Desertion: Desertion occurs when one spouse abandons the other without cause. If a person can prove that their spouse has deserted them for a continuous period of at least three years, they can file for divorce on this ground.
  4. Irretrievable breakdown of the marriage: This is the most common ground for divorce in Kenya. It occurs when the marriage has broken down to the point where it cannot be repaired. If both parties agree that the marriage has irretrievably broken down, they can file for divorce on this ground.
  5. Separation for a continuous period of at least two years: If the parties have been living separately for a continuous period of at least two years, either party can file for divorce on this ground.
  6. Mental illness: If a person can prove that their spouse is mentally ill to the point where they cannot participate in the marriage, they can file for divorce on this ground.
  7. Incurable insanity: If a person can prove that their spouse is incurably insane and has been so for a continuous period of at least five years, they can file for divorce on this ground.

It is important to note that in all cases, the person filing for divorce must be able to provide evidence to support their claim. Additionally, the court may require the parties to attempt to reconcile before granting a divorce on certain grounds, such as irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.

Process Of Divorce In Kenya

1. Prepare for divorce

Before you file for divorce, it is important to take some time to prepare yourself emotionally and financially. This may involve speaking with a therapist, creating a budget, and gathering important documents such as financial statements, tax returns, and property deeds.

It is also important to consider whether you want to hire an attorney to represent you in the divorce proceedings.

While it is possible to file for divorce without an attorney, having legal representation can be helpful in navigating the legal process and ensuring that your rights and interests are protected.

2. Determine the grounds for divorce

In order to file for divorce, you will need to determine the grounds for divorce. This refers to the reason why you are seeking a divorce. In some states, there are both fault and no-fault grounds for divorce.

MUST READ: Digital Lenders Association of Kenya (DLAK)

Fault grounds may include things like adultery, cruelty, or abandonment, while no-fault grounds simply require that the marriage is irretrievably broken.

It is important to note that fault grounds can be more difficult to prove and may require additional legal expenses. Additionally, in some states, fault grounds can impact the division of property and spousal support.

3. File the necessary paperwork

Once you have prepared for divorce and determined the grounds for divorce, you will need to file the necessary paperwork with the court. This typically involves filing a petition for divorce, which outlines the reasons for the divorce and the relief you are seeking.

In addition to the petition, you may also need to file other documents such as financial disclosures, parenting plans (if you have children), and a summons, which notify your spouse that you have filed for divorce.

4. Serve your spouse with the paperwork

After you have filed the necessary paperwork, you will need to serve your spouse with the paperwork. This typically involves having a copy of the petition and other documents delivered to your spouse by a process server or another authorized individual.

In some cases, your spouse may choose to waive service, which means they sign a document acknowledging that they have received the paperwork and do not need to be served.

5. Respond to your spouse’s response

After you have served your spouse with the paperwork, they will have a certain amount of time (typically 30 days) to respond. This response may include an answer to the petition, a counter-petition, or a request for additional information.

Once you have received your spouse’s response, you will need to review it with your attorney (if you have one) and determine the appropriate next steps.

6. Negotiate a settlement

Once both parties have filed their paperwork and responded to each other’s requests, it is common to attempt to negotiate a settlement outside of court. This may involve mediation or negotiation between the parties and their attorneys.

If a settlement can be reached, both parties will sign a settlement agreement that outlines the terms of the divorce, including property division, spousal support, and child custody and support.

7. Attend a trial

If a settlement cannot be reached, the case will proceed to trial. At trial, both parties will present evidence and arguments to a judge, who will make a decision on the terms of the divorce.

It is important to note that going to trial can be a lengthy and expensive process, and the outcome may not be favorable to either party.

8. Finalize the divorce

Once a settlement has been reached or the judge has made a decision, the divorce can be finalized. This typically involves signing a filing a final divorce decree with the court.

The final divorce decree will outline the terms of the divorce, including property division, spousal support, and child custody and support. Both parties will need to sign the final decree, and it will be filed with the court.

Once the final decree has been filed, the divorce is considered final and both parties are legally divorced.

MUST READ: Credit Card Guide; How It Works, Types & Choosing the Right Card

It is important to note that the process of filing for divorce can vary depending on the state you live in and the specific circumstances of your case. It is recommended to consult with an attorney to ensure that you are taking all necessary steps and protecting your rights throughout the divorce process.

Consequences Of Divorce In Kenya

Divorce in Kenya can have a number of consequences, both for the individuals involved and for their families and communities. Here are some of the key consequences of divorce in Kenya:

  1. Emotional and psychological impact: Divorce can have a significant emotional and psychological impact on individuals, particularly if the divorce is contentious or involves issues such as infidelity or domestic violence. Individuals may experience feelings of grief, anger, guilt, and shame, and may struggle with depression or anxiety. Children may also be affected by divorce, particularly if there is a conflict between the parents or if they are forced to choose sides.
  2. Financial impact: Divorce can also have a significant financial impact, particularly for women who may be left without financial support. In Kenya, women are often economically dependent on their husbands and may struggle to support themselves and their children after a divorce. Divorce may also involve the division of property, which can be a complex and contentious process.
  3. Legal consequences: Divorce in Kenya is governed by the Matrimonial Causes Act, which sets out the legal grounds for divorce and the procedures for filing for divorce. In some cases, divorce may involve a lengthy and expensive legal process, particularly if there are disputes over property or custody of children.
  4. Stigma and social consequences: Divorce is still stigmatized in many communities in Kenya, particularly for women. Divorced women may be seen as failures or may be ostracized by their families and communities. Children of divorce may also face stigma and discrimination.
  5. Impact on children: Divorce can have a significant impact on children, particularly if there is a conflict between the parents or if they are forced to choose sides. Children may experience feelings of guilt, anxiety, and depression, and may struggle with school or other activities. In some cases, children may also experience physical or emotional abuse during the divorce process.
  6. Impact on extended family: Divorce can also have an impact on extended family members, particularly if they are involved in caring for children or providing financial support. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, and other family members may be called upon to provide emotional or financial support during and after the divorce process.

In conclusion, filing for divorce can be a difficult and emotional process. It is important to take the time to prepare yourself emotionally and financially, determine the grounds for divorce, file the necessary paperwork, serve your spouse with the paperwork, negotiate a settlement, attend a trial (if necessary), and finalize the divorce.

By following these steps and seeking the guidance of an attorney, you can make the divorce process as smooth and stress-free as possible.

Comments Here👇

Written by The County Info

Amos is an experienced SEO expert. He has an interest in finance, IT, business ideas, and investments. He has also contributed to many global web portals.